orchestral
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Festival Orchestra: Beethoven "Triple" with Bell, Isserlis, Denk

July 14
4:00 pm
$92, $75, $45
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30 minute hold in cart

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orchestral
02

Festival Orchestra: Beethoven "Triple" with Bell, Isserlis, Denk

July 14
4:00 pm
$92, $75, $45

Add to calendar
01

30 minute hold in cart

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PROGRAM
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BARTÓK: Concerto for Orchestra, BB 123
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BEETHOVEN: Concerto for Violin, Cello, and Piano in C major, op. 56, “Triple”

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Three extraordinary solo artists team up for a one of a kind work, Beethoven’s “Triple” Concerto. When played by musicians of the caliber of Joshua Bell, Steven Isserlis, and Jeremy Denk, Beethoven’s piano trio with orchestra is three times the fun of a solo concerto. Listen in on this musical conversation which includes a richly expressive middle movement and a rousing, dancelike finale.

Bartók’s Concerto for Orchestra, his most popular work, was also his last completed orchestral composition. It was commissioned as a showcase for the Boston Symphony Orchestra while the composer was in a New York hospital suffering from leukemia. This opportunity revitalized Bartók, and in only two months, the work was complete. By using the word “concerto,” Bartók meant that the individual sections of the orchestra were often treated soloistically. The first movement is heavily influenced by the folk themes and rhythms of Bartók’s native Hungary, which near the end are played backwards, forwards, and upside down. In the second movement, subtitled Presentation of Couples, pairs of wind instruments and muted trumpets are each given their own theme, which later return embellished by additional instruments. A haunting elegy is followed by an intermezzo which is rudely interrupted by Bartók’s thumbing his nose at Shostakovich, whom he considered overrated. That’s according to Bartók’s son, who said his father happened to hear a broadcast of Shostakovich’s “Leningrad” Symphony and was inspired to parody it. The clarinet plays a march tune from the symphony and is met by jeers from the trombones. The tune is repeated in the style of a German band with a final parody by the tuba. The splendid finale with its brass fanfares and intricate fugue brings the work to an exciting conclusion.

Enjoy a rare musical collaboration and revel in the color and power of the orchestra in this invigorating program conducted by the extraordinary Jane Glover!

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Special 75th anniversary funding for commissions and artist residencies by the Ann B. and Thomas L. Friedman Family Foundation
With special thanks to Mrs. Mercedes T. Bass - Mercedes T. Bass Charitable Corporation
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